Women's Liberation~a trigger warning for the weak

What makes this document so important? Well, it’s based on The Declaration of Independence, mimicking the intent, the preamble and even the formatting of the historical document. While the Declaration of Independence expresses grievances put upon the colonies by the King of Great Britain, the Declaration of Sentiments poses grief subjugated upon the women of the United States by the governing body of that time. Much like our forefathers who stated facts as to why they required independence, Elizabeth Cady Stanton asserted the lack of equal rights to vote but also the deficiency of owning property, representation within legislation, equal work and educational opportunities and much more.

Penned by Elizabeth Cady Stanton in 1848, the above excerpt is the first line of “The Declaration of Sentiments”; a document that was drafted for the United States’ first women’s right’s conference. Even though the original document was lost, it was the beginning of change for women of this great country resulting in the right to vote according to 19th Amendment.


Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a true leader of the women's rights movement in the U.S. from 1850 and beyond. Considered the leading force at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, the first convention with the sole purpose of discussing women's rights, she is classified as the main author of its Declaration of Sentiments.
Elizabeth Cady Standon

What makes this document so important? Well, it’s based on The Declaration of Independence, mimicking the intent, the preamble and even the formatting of the historical document. While the Declaration of Independence expresses grievances put upon the colonies by the King of Great Britain, the Declaration of Sentiments poses grief subjugated upon the women of the United States by the governing body of that time. Much like our forefathers who stated facts as to why they required independence, Elizabeth Cady Stanton asserted the lack of equal rights to vote but also the deficiency of owning property, representation within legislation, equal work and educational opportunities and much more.

Here we are, 172 years later, and I have no real idea what life was like for women living in 1848 or even 1920. I couldn’t imagine growing up or marrying in an era where my family or spouse didn’t value my opinion or growing up with the men around me seeing me as someone who lacked intelligence, with a mind too “feeble” (as was popular opinion during these changing times), because I was of the female gender. Without women like Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucy Stone, or men such as Frederick Douglas or Kansas Senator Pomeroy to push and fight for female citizens, you and I would not be who we are today. Could you imagine needing the permission of our fathers and husbands to open a bank account, own a house, or have written permission to further our learning in higher education?

I am not one to push my political opinions at others. With that being said, it is of the utmost importance to educate yourself in the realm of politics with what is occurring in our nation and local communities. I don’t know everything there is to know about each political party, ; nevertheless, it is important to know enough, so that you can choose what suites your beliefs and moral standings. The women who paved the way for those of today didn’t do so for us to sit idly by; align yourself with a party, register to vote, educate yourself on the issues and vote your beliefs. You may think that your vote is just a drop in the bucket or that your vote does not matter. A bucket gets filled by repeated drops that create the stream. Let’s overfill that bucket, make the women like Elizabeth Cady Stanton proud, after all, it is your privilege and RIGHT.



http://utc.iath.virginia.edu/abolitn/abwmat.html


https://www.history.com/news/search-is-on-for-original-womens-rights-declaration


https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/04/us/declaration-of-independence-full-text-trnd/index.html

One More Day With You
00:00 / 03:39
Archives
Follow Us
  • Instagram
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square